Ana broke French hearts

Ana broke French hearts

When Ana Ivanovic won her first career title as a qualifier in Canberra in January, she was tipped by many as a future star of the women's game.
On Saturday, the 17-year-old from Serbia and Montenegro proved she has the nerve for the big stage when she broke French hearts with a 6-4 3-6 6-4 victory over third seed Amelie Mauresmo in the third round of the French Open.
"It was one of the best matches I've played," Ivanovic said. "Maybe not the best but still I'm really happy that I took my opportunities and I look forward to the next matches."
Ivanovic, who has climbed from 705 in the world rankings at the start of 2004 to her present placing of 31st, showed no fear in front of a packed centre court at Roland Garros to send Mauresmo packing early once again.
But though the Frenchwoman, who has never gone beyond the quarter-finals in her home grand slam event, failed to live up to the hype yet again, Ivanovic showed enough to suggest that she could go a lot further.
Unlike many players who have moved from Eastern Europe to the United States to train, Ivanovic still lives in Belgrade, where she attends high school.
"I have had a few options to go to Florida but I decided to stay in Europe," she said.
"My manager is from Switzerland now and I live in Belgrade so I still have to go to school at home and I try to stay close."
Ivanovic lost to Mauresmo at the Australian Open in January, but said she was a little more nervous playing on the centre court at Roland Garros.
"I played in the Australian Open on centre court but here it was a bit bigger, and I was really impressed.
"I was a little nervous at first but the atmosphere was great, I knew to expect it as she is a home player, but I just tried to stay calm."
Mauresmo was generous in defeat, saying that Ivanovic had a great chance to become a top-10 player.
"She can play at that level, she has proved it in the past with some fantastic performances. You get into the top 10 by being consistent. Can she do that, I think she can."
reuters